The tenure of Gary Friedrich signaled a new status quo for the title. With no major deaths or additions of more pivotal characters as had been seen with Lee and Thomas, Friedrich instead marked his time with a number of uncharacteristic tales that pushed the formula for a Sgt Fury story. Friedrich created a number of memorable guest characters, both hero and villains that merited return appearances. However the title was beginning to show signs of lethargy with a number of stories mired in recycled situations. Also the modern day appearances. of Howlers in annuals and SHIELD tales robbed the stories of any suspense the early Stan Lee tales had when it was unclear if any Howler was safe from harm. In that sense, the risk-taking was gone from the series.

Twice during Friedrich's run, a spin-off war title was launched; Sgt. Savage and his Leatherneck Raiders (later Battlefield Raiders) and Combat Kelly and his Deadly Dozen. Both titles failed, however not before providing the only crossovers for the Sgt Fury title (as the rest of the Marvel Universe was firmly in the present day). The lack of concurrent titles made Sgt Fury atypical in that it did not have the 'shared universe' appeal that made the other Marvel titles popular. Although early issues had been marked by guest-shots by Reed Richards and Captain America, this trend never picked up again. Also of note is Friedrich's penning the Sgt Fury parody Sgt. Furious and His Hostile Commandos: "A Day of Blunder! in the premiere issue of Not Brand Ecch.

On the art-team roster, John Severin joined as inker, making for a perfect match with Ayers, running for a good number of issues Later on, Severin served as cover artist for the title in its reprint stage.

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #42 " Three Were A.W.O.L.!" 
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Tartaglione
Letters: Sam Rosen
  • Gary Friedrich's joins the creative team as writer.
  • Friedrich is one of only two writers to work on both of Fury's 1960's title series
  • Bull McGiveney takes charge of the Howlers

Hang ups along the way to destroy a munitions plant include, Dino, Eric and Fury going AWOL (hence the title), a rescue of of Eric's sister, and Bull McGiveney leading the Howlers.

Eric who was Dino's replacement worries about his sister, Ilsa who yearns for Dino, who is still depressed over the death of his love Nina...and Bull McGiveney takes over the Howlers! Formulaic is what Friedrich's first outing in the title amounts to, but better things were soon to come, and the story hinges on resolving allot of ongoing continuity. Nothing special but a good read. Koenig's sister gets in a good line with her appraisal of the Howlers, "You are all crazy, but in a wonderful way"...nuff said. 

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #43 "Scourge Of The Sahara!" 
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Tartaglione
Letters: Sam Rosen

  • Appearances by Ilsa Koenig, 'Happy' Sam, Rommel, Bob Hope and Glen Miller.
  • A contest for picking a new Commando's divisional patch is announced.

The Howlers are assigned the task of destroying Rommel's super-tank (if it exists) by way of guarding a USO tour. Thier arrival at the British desert outpost coincides with a heavy Nazi attack that is broken off for no reason. The Howlers are order to proceed with guarding the USO tour, but Fury orders Gabe to sneak away and catch sight of the German super-tank, heading their way toward the Howlers.

A bit of an slow start soon gives way to plenty of super-Howler action against a super-tank that would be right at home in a GI:Joe cartoon. The Ayers art is top notch with some immpresive action layouts; one that is even highlighted on the first page by a note from Stan Lee. Rommel's shown to disagree with Hitler, adding a nice historical touch. The hero spotlight shines on Izzey and Gabe in this issue with some considerable action for both. Kudos to Major Redgrave as a good supporting character; shame he never turned up again.

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #44  "The Howlers' First Mission!" 
Writer: Gary Friedrich/(prologue and epilogue) Roy Thomas
Pencils/Inks: John Severin
Letters: Jerry Feldman

  • Only story co-authored by Thomas and Friedrich
  • John Serverin joins the title, alternating as sole artist, cover artist, or inking over Ayers' pencils for the next few issues.
  • 'Junior' Juniper appears in this issue in the flashback to the first Howler mission.
  • Friedrich also pens Sgt. Furious and His Hostile Commandos in the first issue of Not Brand Ecch published the same month
  • Reprinted in #139

One winter evening, while wrapping up a training exercise, the original Howlers wax nostalgic about thier first mission. Reb tales the tale of how the Howlers rescued a British scientest from a German stronghold, using a plan inspired by a Bible story Juniper was reading.

First thing is first, wow, what beautiful art. If there is one thing this title can boast, is having some of the best artist that worked the buisness and Severin brings a beautiful realism to these characters in his art. The story is note-perfect, from the dialouge to the art. Its great to have Juniper back on the team, its a wonder the title never tried filling in with earlier adventures to use him more often. Its interesting to note that Reb is the narrator of the story and not Fury; stranger still the one panel where it seems like Reb expresses some racist feeling towards Gabe, something never before and never again mentioned!

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #45  "The War-Lover!" 
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils/Inks: John Severin
Letters: Al Kurzrok
  • Appearence by Ilsa Koenig and 'Happy' Sam.
  • Reprinted in #140

The Howlers are assigned the task of rescuing Paul Ryan, the battle-hungry son of an Army general. Despite the Holwer's best efforts, Ryan continues to bite off more then he can chew in a mad lust to kill as many Germans as possible.

Living up to the blurb, 'the war mag for those who hate war', Friedrich's tale swings the pendulum far away from the early Howlers stories where suicidal logic seemed to reign supreme. His story is a thoughtful one, presenting the fact that these men don't enjoy any of the killing that happens around them. The overzealous Ryan can be seen as a vessel for so many war stories reporting solider excesses on the battlefield. The running joke about Dum Dum's fedora is really very funny. Admittedly though, it is a missed opportunity that there was no confrontation between Koenig and Ryan on the plan back. This one is another classic story in the Fury series.

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #46 "They Also Serve!" 
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils/Inks: John Severin
Letters: Al Kurzrok

  • Appearance by Bull McGiveney and Rickett's Johnson
  • Reprinted in #141

Following a raid on a French munitions plant, Bull McGiveney is wounded and Eric Koenig attempts to fly him out, but is shot down. With both men trapped behind enemy lines, the Howlers enlist a medic and set off to rescue their comrades.

Change of pace story puts some original twists on the Sgt Fury formula, including an exciting opening featuring McGiveney followed with an eventual teaming up with Koenig in the field, as Friedrich pens an ode to the battlefield medic with the addition of Cliff Powers to the Howlers rescue party. Koenig gets a strong showing, saving McGiveney's life. A situation that would normally run a few panels is milked for plenty of action and drama as Powers proves to be one of the better guest characters and there are plenty of plot turns that keeps the reader engaged. This one ranks as one of the classics of Friedrich's era.

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #47 "Tea & Sabotage!" 
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: Artie Simek
  • The winner fo the divisional patch contest is announced
  • First appearance of Gerta Heinz
  • Appearance by Ilsa Koenig and Colonel Klaue
  • Dino claims to have danced onscreen with Ginger Rogers
  • Reprinted in #142

During a night off for the Howlers, Pinkerton is kidnapped by Nazi spies in London and held by Gerta Heinz where he learns of a pending invasion of England.

Spotlight on Pinky as he's kidnapped in his old home town of London. Surprisingly the story makes effective and enjoyable transitions between the Howlers have a night on the town to Pinky being tortured with innuendos from the fraulein. Going on to make a few return appearances, Heinz makes for a rather lackluster recurring foil, both in terms of character and look (heavyset woman with monocle simply doesn't instill much menace). Minor continuity in regards to the love lives of the Howlers as Fury and Dino seem to finally be getting over their past tragic loves, however both with Ilsa. The surprises in the plot are rather good and the art is of course top notch. This is one to get, especially for Pinky fans.

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #48  "If Britain Should Fall!" 
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: L.P. Gregory

  • Appearence by Jim Morita, 'Happy' Sam, Bull McGiveney and the Maulers
  • Appearence by Adolf Hitler, Colonel Klaue and the Blitz Squad
  • Reprinted in #143

The Blitz squad break out of their English prison and start a reign of terror across London. Soon they invade the Howler headquarters and its every attack squad against the forces of Colonel Klaue.

All-out Howler action as the Blitzers bring it home and attack the Howler's home turf. Now I do like the Blitz Squad, honest I do, but the page where its explained to each of them how they are finish off their Howler counterpart is too much. Like the Blackhawks at DC, once you apply too much of the super-hero formula, you begin to lose credibilty. Regardless the issue is fun and everyone gets in on the action, including Happy Sam. Hitler is never protrayed more as a buffon then in this issue I think. Granted after all is said and done, although defeated, one has to admit, the Blitzers weren't half bad managing to break into headquarters and fend off three attack squads as they did.

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #49  "On To Tarawa!" 
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: Sam Rosen

  • Appearence by Skipper Savage
  • First appearence of Aussi solider Rolfe Harrison, who would later join the Leatherneck Raiders.
  • Izzey Cohen is captured by the Japanese, beginning a multi-part storyline.
  • Reprinted in #144

Enroute to Australia, the Howlers sight a sub and open fire, only to learn its Skipper Savage's submarine come to pick them up. .

Reb's gambling moment is a welcome but of characterization.

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #50 "On The Beach Waits Death!" 
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: Sam Rosen
  • Captain Savage and his Leatherneck Raiders premieres the same month.
  • Junior Juniper is remembered
  • FDR is said to have won his third term
  • Reprinted in #145

The Howlers return to Tarawa in hopes of rescuing Izzey, but learn too late that their fellow Howler was moved.

Pacific theatre action adds allot to this filler issue as the Izzey-POW story arc continues with an action packed return to Tarawa. Adding to the story are supporting characters like Admiral Turner (speaking Happy Sam's lines) and everyone's favorite Aussie, Harrison. The beach landing sequence stands out, a welcome change from the constant string of firefights in the woods of Europe that make up so much of the standard Howlers tales. The return of the camp commandant is one slight flaw as the character ranks pretty low on the villains roster. Although Friedrich managed some memorable Nazi villains, no Japanese villain ever rose to the level of Von Strucker or Klaue.

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #51  "The Assassin!"
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: L.P. Gregory

  • Appearances by President Roosevelt, Winston Churchill and Stalin
  • Rare outing for the Howlers in civilian garb and many without their typical props (bumbershoot, horn, etc)
  • Reprinted in #146

Loyal Nazi citizen Jorgen Kline is handpicked to assassinate Churchill, Stalin, and Roosevelt at the Teheran conference, where the Howlers are serving as bodyguards to the world leaders.

Shades of SHIELD in this assassination thriller which sadly drags on too long with melodramatic dialogue. The penitent German has been done already with better results with Koenig, Kline's characterization just doesn't hold interest. On the other hand, the art combo of John Severin and Dick Ayers is fantastic and goes a long way to making this issue enjoyable. Also kudos go to spotlighting Dino, who is still brooding over the death of Nina (I thought he was over her already).

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #52 "Triumph At Treblinka!" 
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: Artie Simek
  • Reprinted in #147

Happy Sam leads Fury and the Howlers on a mission to Poland to free Dr. Karl Von Rusteg. Breaking into the camp and posing as prisoners, the Howlers and Sam manage to break into the Nazi administration building and then a daring escape.

Unusually strong showing by Happy Sam as he takes point in this mission, for no real reason. Nonetheless the issue offers daring action galore, although the situations are to say the least quite formulaic for the title. The Izzey interlude in the prison camp makes for a spotlight of the character as he continues to endure torture at the hands of his captors, giving him more to do as a POW then he ever did as a Howler. All in all, a good one to pick up at the $1 box.

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #53 "To The Bastions Of Bavaria!" 
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: L.P. Gregory

  • Reprinted in #148

Looking for someone to review and summarize this storyline. Email me if interested

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #54  "Izzy Shoots The Works!" 
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: Sam Rosen
  • Reprinted in #149
Issue spotlighting Izzey Cohen as he tries to make a daring escape from the Japanese POW camp where he's held prisoner. After a successful escape he encounters a local freedom fighter who helps him nearly taste freedom.

Bookended by some minor Howlers business, the issues serves as an excellent solo spotlight for the imprisoned Cohen. Characterization is strong and probably the best the character ever received before or since. The prison camp commander is lent some intelligence which distinguishes him from the roster of easily outwitted Nazis that is usually the staple, and the fact that he was schooled at UCLA is an interesting twist. Of course the only drawback is that there's no plausible reason why Izzey isn't shot on site, but hey, this is a comic book. A must have for Izzey fans. 

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #55 "The Cry Of Battle...The Kiss Of Death!"
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: Sam Rosen

  • Reprinted in #150
  • Appearence by Frenchie

Caught behind enemy lines, the Howlers are imprisoned in a Berlin military hospital where they are separated from Gabe, and Fury meets a nurse, Irma, who looks exactly like his dead lover Pam Hawley. Irma helps the Howlers escape as a member of the German resistance and leads them to the border with France where their old friend Frenchie reveals a truth that Nick Fury finds hard to bear.

Ok, Friedrich gets points for stirring the pot a bit; Gabe is missing with no clue as to what his fate may be (except for the fact he's in the SHIELD comic years later), the Howlers are caught behind enemy lines and wake up in Berlin, and Fury runs into a dead-ringer for his late-lady love Pam, but somehow it just all falls somewhat flat. Its nice to see Frenchie again and Ayers updates Pam nicely via her doppelganger. And I know its all well-intentioned, but Rebel's line about Gabe being the "best cotten-pickin" of them all is a little.....I dunno.

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #56 "Gabriel, Blow Your Horn!" 
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: Mac Duffy

  • Reprinted in #151
  • Appearence by Frenchie.
  • First appearence of Carla Swain, who would appear shortly thereafter in the Sgt Fury King-Sized Special #4.

Gabe Jones, caught behind enemy lines, evades capture and makes contact with Frenchie, only to recieve to be asked for help with rescuing an African-American jazz singer, Carla Swain, from the Nazis. Jones infiltrates the club where Swain is singing, but upon rescuing her learns that she doesn't want to leave. Swain feels she is better off with the Germans because of the racisim back in the United States. Meanwhile the other Howlers are holed up in a safehouse nearby, not knowing that Jones is also in the city. Eventually they meet up and the Howlers' willing moment of surrender for Swain convinces her that a person of color still has a chance back home. Reb Ralston saves the day and the Howlers escape.

Excellent followup to the last issue with a story that confronts some potent racial issues head on. The dilemna of Swain actually calls to mind the story of Paul Robeson and his support of the Soviet Union. Its great to have the spotlight on Gabe Jones, one of the best supporting characters in the this title. The use of Reb Ralston, the clear Southerner in the group, as the one to sway Swain is effective; although Ralston inability to control himself even at the thought of leaving Gabe behind I think is a bit much. The title has never shown the friendship between Ralston and Jones to be any stronger then anyone else's before. The last line from Swain I imagine could have been seen as controversial back then ("I'm no longer a Negreo, I'm an American"), but after an Obama presidency, I don't think its so that much anymore.

Sgt. Fury King-Size Special #4 "The Battle Of the Bulge"
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: Mac Duffy

  • The Howlers fought alongside Captain America during the Battle of the Bulge in Captain America (3) #32
  • Sgt Fury # 104 and Combet Kelly #3-4 follow the Battle of the Bulge

Looking for someone to review and summarize this storyline. Email me if interested

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #57 "The Informer!"
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Tom Sutton
Inks: John Severin
Letters: Jerry Feld

  • Reprinted in #152

The Howlers are ordered to get captured in order to free POWs out of one of the most secure camps in Germany.

Well, it sure ain't Hogan's Heroes in this POW camp actioner, where the Howlers live up to their brawling, fighting reputation. Enlivening the proceedings is the beautiful John Severin art which truly lends the Howlers a strong realistic style. Almost-Howler Jim Morita makes a welcome return appearance as one of the prisoners, making one wonder why he was never added to the team. Jones is used to good effect for the finale and the final panel is another perfect ending. 

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #58  "Right In The Fuehrer's Face!" 
Writer: Arnold Drake
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: Sam Rosen

  • Reprinted in #153
  • First Appearance by the Agent of a 1,000 Faces.

The Agent of a 1,000 Faces (no, not Lon Chaney) poses as actor John Barrywell (no, not Barrymore) and kidnaps Dino. The Howlers learn from a OSS officer that they can mount a mission to Norway to intercept him before he gets to Berlin; but instead walk right into a trap; or so the Nazis think...

Not a moment of suspense, but plenty of action as the Howlers notch themselves a dozy; taking on an entire aircraft carrier of Nazis. Scribe Arnold Drake takes great gusto in the Nazi frustrations with the Howlers, with focus on various Nazi soldiers exclaiming "Are they possessed?", "Are they drugged?", "Are they mad?" The lead villain is certainly the most Marvel-like to appear since Col. Klaue and adds to the story greatly.

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #59 "D-Day For Dum Dum!" 
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: Herb Cooper

  • Izzey returns to the Howlers, last seen escaping/rescued in Captain Savage and his Leatherneck Raiders #6.
  • Appearances. by Col. Klaue, and Hitler.
  • Reprinted in #155, Captain Savage and his Leatherneck Raiders #6 is reprinted in Sgt. Fury #154

Recently fitted with a new, more dangerous mechanical hand, Col. Klaue proposes a new plan to capture Fury, but instead lures Dum Dum. Its up to the Howlers to break out their teammate from a Nazi ship.

Apparently Friedrich read issue #5 and liked it so much that he decided to redo it, substituting Von Strucker for Klaue. Good art and a cool (but unlikely) upgrade to Klaue just isn't enough to make up for the fact that we've seen this exact scenario played out before with better results. Izzey makes his return in this issue, making for a fun 3 first pages. Happy Sam's unexpected (and wonderfully illustrated) arrival at issue's end makes for a good segeway to the next issue which provides one of the story's few surprises. Nonetheless, its not horrible but not one to rush out and get.

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #60 "The Court-Martial Of Dum Dum Dugan!" 
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: Herb Cooper

  • Flashbacks to Fury Special #2, and issues #24, #38, 40, #50, & #59
  • Appearance by Agent of a 1,000 Faces
  • Happy Sam has blue eyes
  • Reprinted in #156

Picking right up from last issue, Dum Dum is put up on court martial for accepting Klaue's lure for a fight against orders. The Howlers testify to Dum Dum's character, one by one in hopes of helping their friend beat the rap.

A bit of a filler issue, basically making the case, like the last issue, that Dum Dum Dugan is by far the most underrated supporting character in Marvel through a heavy use of flashbacks to previous stories. This is a good issue to introduce anyone to the Dum Dum character but Friedrich is not lazy on the plotting as he throws in a clever last minute twist that leads right into the next issue.

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #61  "The Big Breakout!" 
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: Artie Simek
  • Reprinted in #157
  • Happy Sam carries a transmitter in his shoe (shades of SHIELD?)
  • Appearance by Captain Flint, last seen in #11

Happy Sam is in enemy hands (see last issue) and is being tortured for information on Allied invasions of Europe. Sawyer realizes that the Nazi plans for defense are located at the fortress he's in and beings to formulate a plan to break out and steal the plans. Meanwhile the Howlers are flown behind enemy lines where they mount a rescue operation to get their CO out. Sawyer breaks out on his own and steals the plans, but is nearly done in by a German secretary. The Howlers arrive and all make it home.

Routine action for the Howlers, although Happy Sam gets to showcase why he's the toughest CO in the Army. Ayers, Severin, and Simek shine especially in a bottom page splash of Dum Dum breaking open a door; a fairly typical act as the Howlers go, but art wise no one is slacking to be sure. Sawyer's determined kidnapping of the Nazi secretary. is a puzzling twist; it certainly would have been easier to just kill her. Since the reader knows of her life, it paints Sawyer as somewhat of an asshole to just yank her from her life, and Fury's later comment about "fallin for the enemy" makes it look very odd indeed.

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #62 "The Name Is...Bass...Seargent Bass!" 
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: Joe Rosen

  • Reprinted in #158

Retro-tale tells the story of Nick Fury's basic training at Ft. Dix where he endures the torment of Sgt. Bass and tangles with some Nazi agents.  

Ever wonder where Nick Fury learned all his insults? Well read this and you'll see that Happy Sam's manners and life in Hell's Kitchen weren't the only influences on Fury's winning personality. Good art and a fun story, too bad this concept wasn't applied to the rest of the Howlers as it would have made a nice showcases for them all. The cover ranks as one of the most amusing of the series.

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #63 "To Die With Honor!"
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: Jean Simek Izzo
  • Reprinted in #159

Looking for someone to review and summarize this storyline. Email me if interested

Captain Savage & his Battlefield Raiders #11 "Death of a Leatherneck"
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: Syd Shores
Letters:: Jean Izzo


Sgt. Fury & his Howling Commandos #64  "The Peacemonger!" 

Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters:: Sam Rosen

  • The storyline is reprinted consecutively in Sgt Fury #160-161
  • Sgt. Fury #160 reprints Capt. Savage #11, one of only 2 times a Savage story is reprinted.
  • Capt Savage underwent a title change (as well as a shave) from Leatherneck to Battlefield Raiders.
  • Although guest shots existed before, this story marks the first crossover story for either title.  

The Raiders and Howlers are teamed up in an effort to kidnap an atomic scientist who defected to the Japanese. The Raiders are assigned the task acting as a diversion for the Japanese as the Howlers infiltrate the castle fortress holding Professor Terry Reiker. Savage and his men secure the area around the castle, but not before losing one of their own to a sniper.

Meanwhile the Howlers infiltrate the castle and Fury is surprised to find that not only is Reiker a woman, but believes the Japanese are pacifist. The Howlers and Raiders join up and break her out of the castle, but not before Reiker learns the true intentions of the Japanese with respect to her atomic research. .
 

Looking for someone to review and summarize this storyline. Email me if interested

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #65  "Blood Is Thicker!"
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: Jean Izzo 
  • Appearance by Gerta Heinz and Ilsa Koenig


Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #66  "Liberty Rides The Underground!" 
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: Jean Izzo

Looking for someone to review and summarize this storyline. Email me if interested

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #67  "With A Little Help From My Friends!" 
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: Jean Izzo

Looking for someone to review and summarize this storyline. Email me if interested

 

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #68 "On The Sidewalks Of New York!"

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #69  "Holocaust In Hell's Kitchen!" 
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: Jean Izzo

  • Appearances. by Ma, Dawn (now 16 years old) and Jake Fury (now 20 years old).
  • Appearence by Colonel Klaue, operating for some time now in the United States.
  • Dawn and Jake Fury meet Dum Dum and the rest of the Howlers for the first time.
  • Issue #68 Reprinted in #162, #69 reprinted in 163.

Fury is in his hometown of NYC where he puts ina call to the rest of the Howlers to join him for a night during thier furlough in the States. But a reunion with Fury clan is interrupted by Colonel Klaue! .

The Fury home life gets a spotlight as our favorite Howlers goes home for a visit to the streets of Hell Kitchen. An art highlight of the two issues is a dialogue-free page of pure action that showcases Fury taking out a shooter in the NYC streets. Its a standout page in from the art team, made all the better for its lack of words and focus on action action spread across an elegant arrangement of five panels. Later in the the second issue, thre is a striking full page showcase of action circling the face of Dawn Fury that is probably the best thing about the comic. Despite some really top-notch art the plot withKlaue showing up in the US to capture and brainwash Fury is a letdown. There's really nothing to convince the reader that Klaue can get away with being under cover in America, especially with that metal hand. Issue 69 gives Dino a generous spotlight as he comes across the secret Nazi lair, even though its by a terribly unconvincing coincidence. The story doesn't make much of the conflict between the Fury brothers, although the bond of fighting rough in the streets in shown to be strong between them. The feelings of inferiorty felt by Jake here can be seen as laying the groundwork for later stories involving Scorpio. Aside from the art in these two stories, including an especially eye catching cover to #69, there doesn't seem to be enough good story to hang on these two issues.

 

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #70 "The Missouri Marauders!" 

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #71 "Burn, Bridge, Burn!" 
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: Jean Izzo

  • Reprinted in #164-165.
  • The issue #164 reprint also features a reprint from Not Brand Ecch #2 with Knock Furious.

There's a heavily armed French bridge in German hands, and its got to go. Happy Sam sends in the Howlers and the new Missouri Marauders.

If this had been an episode on television, it would have been a backdoor pilot; with much of the story serving as an introduction to the Maulers. Basically both teams try to out macho each other. Its hard enough to flesh out the Howlers in their own stories, throwing in Sgt Bob Jenkins and his bunch mugging for panel space makes this a crowded story. All this would have been easier to handle if at least their mission had been interesting, but its I'm sorry to say that Happy Sam is wrong on this one; its just another milk run. Nothing really saves it art wise either, despite the Ayers/Severin team. Worse still, the story takes two issues. Probably two of the worst issues of the series, in my opinion.

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #72 "Play It Alone, Sam!" 
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: Jean Izzo

  • Reprinted in #166

Happy Sam is hanging out in mess hall with the Howlers and a tune on the piano prompts him to reminisce about an early mission of his (or the movie Casablanca, take your pick).

Nice change of pace issue with the spotligh on Happy Sam walking through a reworked Casablanca plot that has quite an interesting backstory (check out Alter Ego v.3 #6 for a facinating behind the scenes on this very issue). .

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #73  "When Two Worlds Collide!" 
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: Artie Semek

Fury & the Howlers join forces with Kyril Kuslov and a team of Soviet forces to break the German supply line of Nazi troops marching on Moscow. The night before the mission, Fury shows the Russian a night on the town, including a brawl with Bull McGiveny which lands Fury in the brig. The next morning, Kuslov loses points with Fury as he blames the whole fight on him. Tensions continue to mount between Fury and Kuslov as the Russian proposes a lethal full frontal assault in opposition to Fury's strategy.

Solidly entertaining issue enlivened by a welcome supporting character in the Soviet Kyril Kuslov and a good balancing of humor and action. Friedrich's story front loads the story with a good dose of comedy with Fury and Kuslov getting to know each other ending up in a great Fury/Bull fight. Also the latter half of the issue features a welcome spotlight on Dino and Rebel as they daringly take on the German supply line.

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #74 "Each Man Alone!" 
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: Jean Izzo

Operation Jigsaw, where the Howlers must each alone obtain seven Nazi documents simultaneously. The race is on after each Howler grabs his piece to make it to the rendezvous point .There they all meet up with Happy Sam who reveals the documents confirm a Nazi germ-plant is operative. The Howlers join a bombing raid and destroy the plant.

A short summary for a great issue. The nature of the storyline makes for a good change of pace spotlighting each of the Howlers on their own as they try to achieve their objective. Really the plot is not as important as the character moments and one wishes the second half of the story could have been jettisoned for more of the solo missions. This issue is sure to please fans of any particular Howler. Dino's and Pinky's segments are especially good. The cover is one of the best covers of the entire series.

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #75 "The Deserter"
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: Jean Izzo 

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Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #76 "He Fought The Red Baron!"
Writer: Gary Friedrich/Bill Everett
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: Jean Izzo 

  • Nick Fury learns for the first time of his father's military career during WWI

Nick Fury learns from General Hunt that his father, Jack Fury, was a pilot for him during World War I. Hunt recalls the story of his father's career as a war ace over France.

The apple doesn't fall too far from the tree as this story introduces us for the first (and thus far only) time to Nick Fury's father. Its really no surprise that he was a hothead pilot, which in itself is interesting considering the wing-walking stunts Fury would fall into. The hot-headedness seems somewhat overdone, even for a Sgt.Fury comics, however it all works out in the end as Fury seems to consider adding some humility in his persona. The art is solid, however WW I flying scenes are just not that exciting, no fault of the art team, which is solid as always. A rare issues that hilights a part of Fury's history which has gone thus far greatly unchronicled. A must have. 

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #77"Trapped By A Traitor!" 
Writer: Bill Everett
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: Jean Izzo 

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Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #78  "Escape... Or Die!" 
Writer: Bill Everett
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: Jean Izzo 

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Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #79  "Death in the High Castle!"
Writer: Bill Everett/Gary Friedrich
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: Jean Izzo

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Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #81  "The All-American!"
Writer: Al Kurzrok
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: John Severin
Letters: Sam Rosen 

Freddy Jones, high school football star and sure thing for the NFL instead opts to serve his country and joins the war effort, landing with the First Attack Squad. He proves himself to the Howlers time and time again during a mission behind enemy lines.

Al Kurzrok's low-key tale is distinguished by solid art and a good story that harkens back to earlier Stan Lee stories with a nice focus on secondary characters. Aside from the hilarious panel of a gun battle across a stream where Eva Braum stands mid panel in a skimpy bright red swimsuit, the tone of the story is bittersweet and often that mood is overemphasized by Howler dialogue of "I feel something wrong on this one". Nonetheless the story offers some poignantly unsung heroic moments which often make up combat and the issue's climax is a rare bittersweet ending.

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos  #83 "A Legend Called...Man Mountain McCoy!" 
Writer: Gary Friedrich
Pencils/Inks: Dick Ayers
Letters: Sam Rosen

Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #84  "The Devil's Disciples!" 
Writer: Al Kurzrok
Pencils/Inks: Dick Ayers

  • The return of the Agent with 1,000 Faces, last seen in #60.

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Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #86 "A Little Town In France..." 
Writer: Gerard Conway
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: Syd Shores

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Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #88 "Save The General... Win The War!"
Writer: Al Kurzrok
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: Syd Shores
  • Appearance by General George S. Patton.

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Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #90 "...And One Must Die!"
Writer: Al Kurzrok
Pencils: Dick Ayers
Inks: Syd Shores
Letters: Al Kurzrok

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Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #92 " Some Die Slowly!"
Writer: Al Kurzroc
Pencils:
Inks: Syd Shores
Letters: Jean Izzo
  • This double-sized issue features, a reprint of #31 as a back up story.
  • Lists as part of the art team, "Unprecedented, Unknown Penciller", presumably cover artist Herb Trimpe.

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